Essential summer-to-fall skincare transition tips you need to start doing right now.

It seems like only yesterday you were giddy with excitement about an upcoming summer getaway. Suddenly, it’s almost time to unpack your cashmere sweater and jacket collection. But it’s not only your wardrobe that needs a transitional tweak. With the air getting crisper and drier, now it’s the right time to take a hard look at your existing skincare routine. Is it still working for you? If yes – great! Save this article in your to-read list and revisit it a couple of weeks later. But if your skin has been acting up – feeling tight or sensitized more than usual, that’s the sign your routine needs some rethinking.

Below, we’re sharing eight tips to seamlessly transition your skincare regimen between the seasons without stressing or overwhelming your skin.

TIP 1. Question a morning face wash.

If you have oily skin, in summer you’ve likely to been washing your face with a cleanser morning and night. But do you still need it? We, humans, are creatures of habit, so it’s easy to continue doing the same thing even though it might no longer be necessary. Unless it’s boiling outside and you wake up feeling sticky and sweaty, it’s better to use just water and follow up with a toner to prep your face for the day.

TIP 2. Switch to a milder cleanser.

While foaming cleansers with stronger surfactants are great for summer to prevent clogged pores, it’s time to switch things up come fall. If cleanse in the am is a must, go for a gentle hydrating face wash and choose creamy, milky lotion-type cleanser for the night. The same principle applies to choosing cleansing water. Check the ingredient list to make sure it’s formulated with mild cleansing agents that won’t strip your skin of its natural oils.

TIP 3. Upgrade your NIGHT moisturizer, keep using your lightweight gels.

We often hear that we should switch to heavier moisturizers AS SOON AS fall is on the corner. But let’s be honest, September is probably the most unpredictable and controversial month in terms of the weather. One day you regret not layering your moisturizer and the next, you wish you’ve opted for a light gel instead. When the weather is playing tricks, we recommend tweaking your night routine first. Ensuring you get enough hydration and moisture at night can help you to get away with keep using a lighter day cream. Look for the cream (or sleeping mask) that has the right humectants, emollients, and occlusives ratio to provide holistic moisturizing benefits.

A quick reminder. Humectants (hyaluronic acid, glycerin) will improve your skin’s ability to draw water from the environment. Emollients (ceramides) will strengthen the skin’s protective barrier and smooth your skin. Finally, occlusives (silicones) will form a protective film on top of your skin to ensure that the skin can hold moisture for longer.

The same principle applies to sheet masks. Choose masks with moisturizing and nourishing benefits that will help to seal all that moisture in. And voila! Follow up with your usual routine in the morning, and your skin will be weather-proof.

TIP 4. Consider adding eye cream.

The eye contour has the thinnest, most delicate skin. No surprise then, it can get dehydrated quickly once the temperatures drop. So, we recommend paying extra attention to an eye area, investing in a special cream or a good moisturizer that can double as eye cream.

TIP 5. Protect, Protect, Protect.

Just because you’ve packed your bikini away doesn’t mean you should do the same with your sunscreen. While the UVB rays (the ones that give you tan) aren’t as strong in fall and winter, UVA rays (the ones responsible for cancer and premature aging) aren’t going anywhere even when it’s icy cold outside. Long story short, protecting your skin from UV damage is a year-round job. So stock up on your favorite sunscreen and apply (and reapply) to the face, neck, ears, chest and any exposed areas to shield your skin from harmful rays.

TIP 6. Exfoliate more? Less?

Ah, that’s the tricky one, and it entirely depends on your skin type. Oily skin types tend to exfoliate more in summer because that’s when skin produces the most oil increasing chances for clogged pores and congested skin. Those with dry skin, however, tend to exfoliate more in colder months because that’s when their skin becomes patchy and flaky. In other words, If you’ve regularly been exfoliating during summer, fall is the time to go easy on your scrubs and peel gels. But if your skin looks scaly, rough to the touch and make-up cakes up,  it’s time to welcome exfoliators back in your skincare routine.

While the UVB rays (the ones that give you tan) aren’t as strong in fall and winter, UVA rays (the ones responsible for cancer and premature aging) aren’t going anywhere even when it’s icy cold outside.

TIP 7. Consider switching bedding.

Even the nicest, softest cotton can cause friction on dry, sensitive skin. Consider switching to silk pillowcases that offer numerous benefits not only for your skin (like keeping it smooth and wrinkle-free) but hair as well.

TIP 8. Invest in an air humidifier.

Usually, your skin draws moisture from the environment to maintain optimal water-oil balance. During fall and winter, as humidity levels drop, your skin can quickly become dehydrated, especially once the heating season starts. We recommend getting a humidifier and turn it on as soon as you get home to help your skin naturally replenish moisture.

The bottom line is, however, you choose to approach the transitioning process; it’s essential not to overhaul your skin regimen all at once. The goal should always be nudging your skin in the right direction and helping it to adjust to seasonal changes without causing stress.

Any other tips to add? Let us know in the comments below!

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